A Thought from Lord Byron

O nature’s noblest gift – my grey goose-quill!

Slave of my thoughts, obedient to my will,

Torn from thy parent bird to form a pen,

That mighty instrument of little men!

Lord Byron

How very delightful to hear your pen listens to your thoughts so well! Mine is hardly so obedient…

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6 Comments

Filed under Quotables

6 responses to “A Thought from Lord Byron

  1. Words are a powerful tool and one I enjoy using. However, I don’t use a pen much less a goose quill. My keyboard works well when my fingers do….thanks for sharing this Harma Mae….it is good to be home again…though I enjoyed our European adventure!

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    • Glad to hear you’re back safely! I’ve written a bit before about how I actually do use a pen, and re-type it later (though it does depend on what exactly I’m writing and how fast it needs to be done). The goose-quill part is a bit archaic though 🙂

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  2. Alexia

    I’m not very familiar to Lord Byron’s work. I know about him, but I don’t remember reading his poetry. Anyways, I’m sure his pen had bad days too, don’t worry !

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    • Yes, I have not read much of his poetry either, aside from what I had to read for my English classes. But when I came across this quote of his, I was like… wow, you sounds confidant in your writing. Most authors I’ve heard of talk about how hard it is to write down what’s in their heads. 🙂

      Anyway, from what little of Lord Byron I know, he was quite a character. He brought a bear to Oxford as a “pet,” since dogs weren’t allowed, and had numerous scandalous love affairs. I don’t know how much I’d enjoy his poetry if I read more if it. But his works are certainly considered “classics.”

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  3. Alexia

    Yes, he certainly is a classic, but he’s not exactly well-known here. When it came to poetry we had to study Arthur Rimbaud’s “Sleeper in the Valley” or Victor Hugo’s “Tomorrow at Dawn”. And those poems aren’t exactly joyful… I should get interested in english poets, but so far I’ve only read some Emily Dickinson…

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